A step towards boosting Indigenous entrepreneurship in the NT

Kakadu Kitchen
Kakadu Kitchen is a Indigenous-led bushfood-tech business aiming to grow Australia's native food industry. Picture: Kakadu Kitchen

Charles Darwin University (CDU) has recently launched a new course specifically targeted at Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students who want to develop entrepreneurial skills and study business.

The four-week intensive learning and mentoring course aim to give a smooth transition for further tertiary study in the university and possibly develop more Indigenous-owned businesses in the Northern Territory.

The course is delivered at the CDU Darwin Waterfront Campus and develops skills in academic literacy over its four weeks.

The enabling program also acts as an important step for First Nations students towards studying for a degree, as students become familiarised with the university academic environment and study expectations.

CAAMA’s Philippe Perez spoke with CDU’s First Nations pre-business enabling program coordinator and business lecturer Dr Chrystie Watson about the program (audio below).

Philippe also spoke with the business student and peer mentor in the program Ben Tylor, the founder of Kakadu Kitchen and a Bininj entrepreneur and from the community of Murdudjurl in Kakadu National Park (audio below).

Strong Voices: Looking back on 2021

From left, Deborah Di Natale, Phil Brown and Selena Uibo. Picture: Philippe Perez/CAAMA

2021 is coming to a close and on the final Strong Voices program of the year we look back.

We start by looking back to May when CAAMA’s Gilmore Johnston caught up with Arrente woman and Trachoma Community Engagement Officer Lesley Martin. She gave an update on reducing rates of the disease in remote communities.

Back in September the remote New South Wales community of Wilcannia was in the grip of a COVID outbreak. The outbreak saw many of towns predominately Aboriginal population getting COVID-19.

In 2020 Australia saw the devastation inflicted on the more than forty-thousand-year-old Juukan Gorge caves. Senate committee inquiry into the destruction of the Juukan Gorge rock shelter handed down its final report in October of 2021.

In October the Aboriginal Justice Agreement was launched in Central Australia. The agreement is a seven-year plan looking to engage Aboriginal Leadership and improve services for remote NT communities.

Strong Voices will be taking a break over January and will return in February. Stay safe and have a wonderful Christmas and New Year’s break.

CAAMA Radio News 23-12-2021

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CAAMA Radio News, December 23 2021

In today’s bulletin (6pm):

  • Ten new COVID cases have been recorded in the Northern Territory overnight – Five of those being local cases residing in the Wuppa Town Camp in Tennant Creek. Those five are all close contacts of previous positive cases.
  • A court ruling says a $21 million grant to be paid to a company to explore for fracking on the Beetaloo Basin is invalid.
  • The late actor David Dalathingu will be making his final journey home to his Yolnu country and will be remembered in a ceremony in the new year.

Plus more

CAAMA Radio produces four local news bulletins airing at 10am, 12pm, 4pm and 6pm every weekday.

Remember when… John Denver came to Alice Springs.

All images Paul Wiles

“Music does bring people together. It allows us to experience the same emotions. People everywhere are the same in heart and spirit. No matter what language we speak, what color we are, the form of our politics or the expression of our love and our faith, music proves we are the same.” – John Denver

John Denver, was an American singer-songwriter, actor, activist, and humanitarian whose greatest commercial success was as a solo singer. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career with folk music groups during the late 1960s.[4] Starting in the 1970s, he was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the decade and one of its best-selling artists.[5] By 1974, he was one of America’s best-selling performers.

John Denver, Debbie Boone and American actress Susan Saint James performed at Anzac Oval on the 7th December 1977… were you there?

A sample of John Denver’s amazing songs- many of which remain favorites even today.

Listen below to some of the audio from the show :

Federal court rules grant to fracking company by Federal Resources Minister is invalid

A Federal court ruling says a grant to be paid to a company planning to explore for fracking on the Beetaloo Basin is invalid. The Environment Centre NT’s argued the Federal government had failed to make a number of required, reasonable inquiries into a range of matters before granting Empire Energy subsidiary Imperial Energy $21 million.

The court had ruled that one grant of $21 million contract was unreasonable because it occurred when legal activity was underway. A number of traditional owners across the basin have voiced their opposition to fracking activity for a number of years.

In a statement the Northern Territory Protect Country Alliance spokesperson Daniel Robins says “Territorians didn’t want to see public money wasted on fracking projects that will threaten groundwater and are opposed by Traditional Owners.”

Clearings for gas exploration in the Beetaloo Basin. courtesy (ABC News Jane Bardon)

From Northern Territory Protect Country Alliance webpage:

The gas industry has estimated the Beetaloo Basin, an enormous shale gas resource 400 kilometres south of Darwin, contains enough energy to power Australia for 200 years.

The Beetaloo Sub-Basin, around 500 kilometres south-east of Darwin NT, sits in the Sturt Plateau region, between Mataranka to the north, Elliott to the south and Borroloola to the east. Around 70 per cent of the Territory’s prospective shale gas resources are said to exist in the 28,000 square km Beetaloo Sub-basin area and this has seen keen interest from a range of gas companies. Exploration history dates back more than a decade, but in recent years, Origin Energy (among others) has had its sights set on the region.

Origin’s gas licences alone are said to hold gas reserves of around 6.6 trillion cubic feet, according to industry predictions. Though rich in shale gas, the basin takes in pastoral land and Indigenous communities.

Listen to Philippe Perez interview with Dan Robins here:

Resources Minister Keith Pitt says he also welcomed the announcement, saying the legal instrument under which the grant was given was deemed valid and that he will move ahead with the program

CAAMA Radio News 22-12-2021

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CAAMA Radio News, December 22 2021

In today’s bulletin (6pm):

  • The lockdown in Tennant Creek and Ali Curung has been extended for another 24 hours, while five new COVID cases were recorded in the Northern Territory. Meanwhile a mask mandate has been implemented in Alice Springs and Amoongoona up until Christmas Eve.
  • Barngarla Traditional Owners on South Australia’s Eyre Peninsula have formally lodged a legal challenge to the federal government’s plan to build a nuclear waste dump in their region near the town of Kimba.
  • The board of the Aninginyi Aboriginal Health Corporation have criticised the Barkly Regional Council over what they say is an unfair eviction of their gym facility which the corporation ran for many decades.

Plus more

CAAMA Radio produces four local news bulletins airing at 10am, 12pm, 4pm and 6pm every weekday.

CAAMA Radio News 21-12-2021

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Get in contact with the CAAMA Newsroom: news@caama.com.au

CAAMA Radio News, December 21 2021

In today’s bulletin (6pm):

  • 14 new cases of COVID cases have been recorded in the Northern Territory overnight with 11 linked to the Katherine cluster.
  • The First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria has called for the Victorian government to raise the age of criminal responsibility to the age of 14.
  • The NT branch of the Australian Medical Association or AMA they are concerned over staffing levels of clinics in Central Australian communities and within Alice Springs.

Plus more

CAAMA Radio produces four local news bulletins airing at 10am, 12pm, 4pm and 6pm every weekday.

CAAMA Radio News 20-12-2021

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Get in contact with the CAAMA Newsroom: news@caama.com.au

CAAMA Radio News, December 20 2021

In today’s bulletin (6pm):

  • Three new COVID cases have been announced in the Northern Territory overnight, one in a child at the Howard Springs quarantine facility who is close contact with the Tennant Creek Wuppa town camp. The other two are from the Walkabout Bore outstation near Barrow Creek.
  • The NT Member for Barkly Steve Edgington has criticised a lack of information in relation to exposure sites associated with infected people from Tennant Creek.
  • The peak body looking after Reconciliation Action Plans or RAPs says there is a fast-growing network of organisations committing to better engagement with Indigenous customers , but many large corporate businesses have a long way to go.

Plus more

CAAMA Radio produces four local news bulletins airing at 10am, 12pm, 4pm and 6pm every weekday.

Strong Voices – we revisit issues and events from earlier in the year

This week in Strong Voices, we look back at the year on the program.

In January Professor Frank Bongiorno Australian political, and cultural historian and head of the school of history at the Australian National University questioned how as a nation we can mark and respect the love of country felt by so many settler Australians -when that same country was taken from the  First Nations whose love for it is as intense as the pain of their loss?”

In April this year residents of Alice Springs saw another edition of Parrtjima be held in the town’s Desert Park. CAAMA’s Jenni Hubert caught up with Festival curator Rhoda Roberts.

In May, a campaign was launched to build the country’s first national truth-telling museum and healing centre for survivors of the Stolen Generations and their families.

CAAMA’s Josef Jakkamarra Egger spoke with Kinchela Chairperson, and Stolen Generation survivor Uncle James Michael ‘Widdy’ Welsh.

In June, residents of Ltyentye Apurte Santa Teresa celebrated the relaunch of their new sports oval, which brought improved facilities for AFL teams playing in the community.

The formerly dusty oval has now fully been grassed with the MCG sending goalposts to the remote community, new lights installed care of raised funds from traditional owners and a new irrigation system that uses heavily filtered local bore water.

Listen to Strong Voices below

CAAMA Radio News 17-12-2021

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CAAMA Radio News, December 17 2021

In today’s bulletin (6pm):

  • The Federal Government has released a final report on an Indigenous voice to parliament co-designed model this morning.
  • Tennant Creek will be going into lockdown restrictions until 5pm on December 20 due to 4 confirmed cases of COVID being found in the community. 8 cases in total were found in the Territory overall.
  • The Queensland Government has granted petroleum leases to an energy company which could begin fracking exploration in the Channel Country, which traditional owners say have they have not been consulted on.

Plus more

CAAMA Radio produces four local news bulletins airing at 10am, 12pm, 4pm and 6pm every weekday.

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