Cuttings: bits and pieces from “real” life

Cuttings explores and  talks about what if life isn’t all roses. What if there is friction, what if there is times when families are dysfunctional and how do we deal with that ?


 Front L to R  Bert O’Loughlin, Jo Dutton, Armani Francois, back L-R  Dan Murphy, Sophie Wallace and Jody Kopp,  
JOdy Kopp and playwright Jo Dutton. Paul Wiles photo

It’s written from a woman’s point of view… a mother’s point of view primarily. There is so much mixed messaging around mothering and about parenting… and we wanted to explore that and the role of women in society.

Listen to interview with Jody Kopp and Jo Dutton here :

The performance which is being held at Araluen Theatre this Saturday night is recommended for 15 years and over. 

It contains strong sexual references, sexual abuse references, and strong language. 

Tickets available at Araluen Box Office or call 8951 1122.

CAAMA Radio News August 24 2021

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Get in contact with the CAAMA News: news@caama.com.au

In today’s bulletin (6pm):

  • A rally is being planned this Thursday to object to the Northern Territory’s application  to compulsory acquire the ANZAC Oval precinct for the proposed National Aboriginal Art Gallery in Mbantwe Alice Springs.
  • A new local theatre production starring an Arrernte actor is set to challenge the perception that life is a bed of roses.
  • There is continued concern over COVID outbreaks in Western NSW communities with high Aboriginal populations, with the Federal Government deploying five ADF teams to the region.

Plus more

CAAMA Radio produces four local news bulletins airing at 10am, 12pm, 4pm and 6pm every weekday.

Arrernte TO’s continue to push for the National Aboriginal Art Gallery south of the Gap

Owen Cole and Harold Furber
Owen Cole (left) and Harold Furber both oppose the compulsory acquisition of the ANZAC Hill Precinct to build the National Aboriginal Art Gallery. Photo credit: Philippe Perez / CAAMA

A rally is being planned this Thursday to object to the Northern Territory’s plan to compulsory acquire the ANZAC Oval precinct for the proposed National Aboriginal Art Gallery in Mbantwe Alice Springs.

A tribunal hearing at Northern Territory Civil and Administrative Tribunal is set to be heard on Thursday and Friday (August 26 and 27) which will hear arguments for and against the compulsory acquisition decision.

Harold Furber, who is part of the Save ANZAC Oval Group, says the ANZAC Hill precinct was built and owned by the community, and the wishes of the Arrernte custodians of the region still are to have the gallery built south of Heavitree Gap.

Owen Cole is also part of the group and will make a presentation at the hearing opposing the acquisition. He questioned a strategy to link the proposed redevelopment of the Alice Plaza which was conditional upon the gallery being built at the ANZAC Hill precinct.

Mr Cole – who is the managing director of Yeperenye Pty Ltd overseeing the Yeperenye Shopping centre – says the private sector should also look to fund their own developments.

Both Owen Cole and Harold Furber spoke to CAAMA’s Philippe Perez (audio below).

Feature photo: Owen Cole and Harold Furber, who both oppose the compulsory acquisition of the ANZAC Hill Precinct to build the National Aboriginal Art Gallery. Photo credit: Philippe Perez/CAAMA

Audio: Owen Cole and Harold Furber speaking to CAAMA’s Philippe Perez

Is this the most significant legacy of Australia’s Aboriginal people?

The  author of more than ninety reports and twenty-five published papers about Aboriginal cultural heritage, community life and relations to land  has shared  what he believes is  the most significant legacy of Australia’s First Nations Peoples .

photo courtesy /Scott Cane

Scott Cane an anthropologist/archaeologist grew up in Tasmania and went on to live  with  Ngarti and Kukatja people living in the Great Sandy Desert of Western Australia- recording their lives and capacity for survival on many different levels.

I found myself in the Great Sandy Desert with people that made contact twenty years before I arrived there in 1980 – fresh out of the desert in a sense. I was smart enough to work out that when I was in Tasmania and reading journals of the white people  who had spent time  living with the Tasmanian’s in 1830, the time frame between contact and those people was exactly the same time frame as I was experiencing in 1980 from people that came out in the late 50’s and 60’s. Because of my own passionate experience in Tasmania, I kind of went, there is so much here to learn and so much to find out!

 

photo courtesy of Scott Cane

 So for me Aboriginal people’s contribution isn’t as a great big pyramid…. there is a massive and monumental and social and artistic consciousness that seems to be unique to indigenous people in Australia – more so than anywhere else on earth!

photo courtesy Scott Cane

Dr. Scott Cane speaks about his journey with Paul Wiles and speaks of what he believes is the greatest contribution that Aboriginal people  continue to deliver.

CAAMA Radio News, August 23 2021

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Get in contact with the CAAMA News: news@caama.com.au

In today’s bulletin (6pm):

  • The Chief Medical Officer of the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress says there needs to be more take up of vaccines against COVID-19 from the Central Australian population
  • The trial of Constable Zachary Rolfe, who has been accused of the alleged murder of KLumajayi Walker has been further delayed after an intervention from the High Court
  • A new discussion paper from the Australia Institute looks at how major reforms could better impact work and livelihood programs in remote Australia.

Plus more

CAAMA Radio produces four local news bulletins airing at 10am, 12pm, 4pm and 6pm every weekday.

CAAMA NEWS 20th AUGUST 2021

Aboriginal leaders and peak community controlled health services have expressed deep and growing concern  about low vaccination rates in Indigenous communities across  the country. Chief executive of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation  Pat Turner says  she wanted to see a vaccination rate of 100 per cent for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Greater Sydney’s lockdown will now last until at least the end of September. after  New South Wales  recorded 644 new locally acquired cases of COVID-19 and four more deaths on Friday.

Victoria  has recorded 55 new locally acquired cases of  COVID-19  and  the outbreak has  now spread to a regional part of the state.

Children aged between 12 and 15 will now be able to access the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine in the Northern Territory.

CAAMA Sports Show 20th August

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The CAAMA Radio Sports Show is back bringing you all the footy action across the NT. This Friday the 20th Fry Tuck is joined in the studio with Dylan and some other special guests.

Fry Tuck also caught up with Western Arrernte and Plenty Highway.

Western Arrernte
Plenty Highway

Strong Voices: COVID-19 concerns for Aboriginal people in Central Australia

On today’s program the centres peak Aboriginal community controlled health service has warned that five in a hundred people could die if the delta variant takes off in the region.

We also look at a new discussion paper published by The Australia Institute, which looks at how major reforms could better impact on work and livelihood programs in remote Australia.

And we’ll hear part two of Phillipe Perez’s interview about a referendum on a constitutionally enshrined First Nations Voice to Parliament.

Will lockdowns be enough to protect Aboriginal communities?

With growing concern across Australia about the spread of COVID-19 into regional Aboriginal communities, health advocates throughout Central Australia are voicing their concerns.

Dr. John Boffa – Chief Medical Officer with the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Paul Wiles photo.

The peak Aboriginal community-controlled health service in Central Australia – Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (CAAC), has warned that five in one hundred people could die if the delta variant takes off in the region.

Chief Medical Officer with the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress Dr. John Boffa says that if the Delta variant of COVID gets into Aboriginal communities a lot of people are going to die if they aren’t vaccinated.

Dr. Boffa also stated ‘ that if the delta variant of covid gets into communities, because of overcrowding and a whole heap of issues, it spreads more easily such as the cases in New South Wales.

Dr. Boffa highlighted that contrary to public perception, vaccination rates in remote communities are in fact higher than that of the population residing within the (Mparntwe) Alice Springs community.

” Our real challenge is right here in Alice Springs. It’s in the town camps, it’s in the townhouses as well as remote.”

Dr. Boffa stated that more than seven million Australians have been vaccinated with the Pfizer vaccine and not a single person has died, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders making up for around two hundred thousand of that figure. However, with vaccination rates continuing to climb, vaccination rates still remain concerningly low within Aboriginal communities throughout central Australia.

Aerial view (Utju) Areyonga community

” Five people out of every one hundred will die if they get infected and they’re not vaccinated. If they’re vaccinated they won’t die, it’s as simple as that. “

With the Northern Territory government quick to respond to early outbreaks and the Chief Ministers ‘ go hard, go early’ approach, the Territory has luckily “dodged a bullet” but this doesn’t mean we should become complacent.

Dr. Boffa said he fears that we cannot continue to rely on lockdowns to keep protecting us saying the Delta variant is so infectious that even if we do go hard and go early, it’s possible that it’s still going to get into the community and start spreading.’

Congress – Gap Road Clinic ( Mparntwe) Alice Springs

Territorians are the lock down legends – we go hard, we do it fast and we do it right!

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Greater Darwin’s lock down will end at 12:00pm today as scheduled, but the Katherine lock down has been extended for 24 hours.

Northern Territory Chief Minister Michael Gunner said the Katherine lock down was “on track” to end at 12:00pm Friday but some additional restrictions will remain in place.

Paul Wiles photo

Listen to Chief Minister Michael Gunner’s press conference from this morning here.

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